Read eBook Memórias póstumas de Brás CubasAuthor Machado de Assis – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

Do not mourn the dead They know what they are doing Clarice Lispector, The Hour of the StarWith those lines, Lispector might have introduced this novel by her countryman Told from the other side of the grave, we learn of the narrator s small successes and small failures, ultimately balanced in the totality of things Braz Cubas, the narrator, provides his autobiography, and his philosophy, with a gentle humor in a novel which anticipates the best of meta fiction, breaking with a Romantic Do not mourn the dead They know what they are doing Clarice Lispector, The Hour of the StarWith those lines, Lispector might have introduced this novel by her countryman Told from the other side of the grave, we learn of the narrator s small successes and small failures, ultimately balanced in the totality of things Braz Cubas, the narrator, provides his autobiography, and his philosophy, with a gentle humor in a novel which anticipates the best of meta fiction, breaking with a Romantic literary tradition in South America and leaping into a Realism that feels contemporary Come, my great lecher, the voluptuousness of extinction awaits you Braz Cubas describes his romances and political aspirations with a detachment The sharp and judicial eye of public opinion loses its power as soon as we enter the territory of death I do not deny that it sometimes glances this way and examines and judges us, but we dead folk are not concerned about its judgment You who still live, believe me, there is nothing in the world so monstrously vast as our indifference He constantly cajoles and engages the reader Tis good to be sad and say nothing When I read these words of Shakespeare, I felt within me an echo, a delicious echo I remember sitting under a tamarind tree, with the poet s book open in my hands and my spirit as crestfallen as a sick chicken I pressed my silent grief to my breast and experienced a curious feeling, something that might be called the voluptuousness of misery Voluptuousness of misery Memorize this phrase, reader store it away, take it out and study it from time to time, and, if you do not succeed in understanding it, you may conclude you have missed one of the most subtle emotions of which man is capable He likens life to the constant revision of a book Let Pascal say man is a thinking reed He is wrong man is a thinking erratum Each period in life is a new edition that corrects the preceding one and that in turn will be corrected by the next, until publication of the definitive edition, which the publisher donates to the worms.He encourages the slow reading, the consideration of his text by direct challenge I am beginning to be sorry that I ever undertook to write this book Not that it bores me I have nothing else to do indeed, it is a welcome distraction to eternity But the book is tedious, it smells of the tomb, it has a rigor mortis about it a serious fault, a yet a relatively small one, for the great defect of this book is you, reader And the slow reading, the thoughtful consideration pays off Language Camaraderie with the narrator unreliable, and frequently unlikeable, as he is wins us over A constant source for highlighting and reflection The best way to not be the great defect is to read this one as the narrator reads himself Savory Imagine, if you will, this title said aloud, with an accent of one type or another do you hear, Epitaph for a Small Weiner I feel a certain amount of shame mentioning this, however the narrator does , on several occasions, express concern over his small sword while Napoleon had a large sword Just something to think about, but not for all that long I would very much like to read this again in the afterlife preferably without the four cups of coffee galivanting through my nervous system Thank you very much. this book is written with apathy, with the apathy of a man now freed of the brevity of the century, a supinely philosophical work, of an unequal philosophy, now austere, now playful, something that neither builds nor destroys, neither inflames nor cools, and, yet, it isthan a pastime and less than an apostolate.My Goodreads morning started on an emotional note today I logged in and found a book recommendation by Ali, friendly comments from Dolors and Dustin, the surprised mention of mthis book is written with apathy, with the apathy of a man now freed of the brevity of the century, a supinely philosophical work, of an unequal philosophy, now austere, now playful, something that neither builds nor destroys, neither inflames nor cools, and, yet, it isthan a pastime and less than an apostolate.My Goodreads morning started on an emotional note today I logged in and found a book recommendation by Ali, friendly comments from Dolors and Dustin, the surprised mention of my name in Manny s review and lovely messages in the inbox Whatcould I have asked for The update feed however, presented a different and grim story altogether A chilling reminder about the unfavorable direction this site is heading towards A site which is of, by and for the readers Good readers, Great readers, readers without whose recommendations and reviews, I wouldn t be the reader, I m today Emotions surged up when I started imagining the what ifs scenarios and when you dedicate a huge chunk of your time to a virtual world, the happenings in that world whether positive or negative, affects you in incommensurable proportions It s affecting me too and I would like to extend my heartiest thanks to each and everyone who are raising their voice in protest and hope that whatever happens the good reader in you will persevere and find blissful solace in wonderful books.May I recommend The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas Death is inevitable and melancholy is alright but what fun to have an everlasting smile pasted on your face while reading a book Bras Cubas is dead but gifted us all these wonderful posthumous memoirs Why Posthumous Probably our narrator, a supposed alter ego of our author was seeking a full fledged creative freedom and wanted to break all the rules of writing that must be in practice during his time The year was 1880 and Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis gave us this enchanting literary treat which surely holds the power to fascinate everyone of us in the present world of countless genres and sub genresHe had no other philosophy Nor did I I m not saying that the university hadn t taught me some philosophical truths But I d only memorized the formulas, the vocabulary, the skeleton I treated them as I had Latin I put three lines from Virgil in my pocket, two from Horace, and a dozen moral and political locutions for the needs of conversation I treated them the way I treated history and jurisprudence I picked up the phraseology of all things, the shell, the decorationThe truth in his humor, the irony in his innocent expressions and the wisdom in his reckless way of living life while he lived , will make you instantly fall in love with Cubas He s not perfect but he s perfectly human The writer in him finds a way of telling us his witty intentions without sticking to conventions as apparent in the following quotesWhat looks like a simple inventory here are notes I d taken for a sad and banal chapter that I won t write.I found in her a certain ethereal softness wedded to the polish of earthly forms a vague expression and worthy of a chapter in which everything must be vague.Few tears, lots of laughs and random sighs the life viewed from the other side of the grave is not sieved through the judgmental eyes of the people around us but comes across in an unadulterated form consists of memories collected, mistakes committed and admissions of guilt in the confession box of our hearts and in retrospect, the life appears to be beautiful Cubas tells us that and that s what we should tell ourselves while we are livingBelieve me, remembering is the least evil No one should trust present happiness, there s a drop of Cain s drivel in it With the passing of time and the end of rapture, then, yes, then perhaps it s possible really to enjoy, because between these two illusions the better one is the one that s enjoyed without pain. The reader, like his fellows, doubtless prefers action to reflection, and doubtless he is wholly in the right So we shall get to it However, I must advise that this book is written leisurely, with the leisureliness of a man no longer troubled by the flight of time that is a work supinely philosophical, but of a philosophy wanting in uniformity, now austere, now playful, a thing that neither edifies nor destroys, neither inflames nor chills, and that is at onceof a pastime and less thThe reader, like his fellows, doubtless prefers action to reflection, and doubtless he is wholly in the right So we shall get to it However, I must advise that this book is written leisurely, with the leisureliness of a man no longer troubled by the flight of time that is a work supinely philosophical, but of a philosophy wanting in uniformity, now austere, now playful, a thing that neither edifies nor destroys, neither inflames nor chills, and that is at onceof a pastime and less than a preachment TheI read, theI come to understand that the trait I admire most in authors is not so much a matter of elegant prose, complex plots, characters that leap off the pages and make their home in your heads when the last page has been turned and the story has ended Those are all very entertaining in their own right, but clever is as clever does, and rarely provokes long lasting admiration in my mind What I prefer is a simple matter of trust, belief, faith even if that is the direction your theological tendencies swing Faith of the author in themselves, butimportantly, enough faith in their audience to lead them without expounding, carry them along in the pages without tending to their every need and pandering to their every expectation.Some would disagree with me on that point In fact, many would, all those folks who dislike books for trying too hard and being too smart Those who feel that the author did not adhere to the formula enough to guarantee formulaic enjoyment of the audience, and decry them for leading them out of their literary comfort zones and making them confront a strange beast of ink and paper Oftentimes they look at this weird creature and see something of themselves inside it Sometimes this bothers them More frequently than you d expect, this scares them.So what does this have to do with this book here, you ask Good question I haven t quite figured it out myself, actually At least, not at this exact point in time, as I type down these words in the middle of a coffee shop, the book itself on my right and a list of its quotes on the left That s why you re here You re joining me on this journey, the goal of which is to find the purpose of conducting in the first place Circular, no But true.What this book achieves is an astounding thing in this current age, but even so when one takes into account the year of publication 1880, two years after The Brothers Karamazov and four years before The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn If you asked me which isclosely related to this particular specimen, I d have to say TBK But only in terms of the wealth of philosophical content, the exacting and measured analysis of the human condition, the grappling with questions of success, reputation, and mortality TBK tells you a story in a sonorous tone, preaches from the pulpit of its well deserved yet greatly intimidating authorial presence This book hops up on the stand, poses with hand on hip, says a few words in a serious tone, then quickly hops down and invites you to the back table to ruminate and reminisce over a few choice bottles of the finest vintages There is a man behind the curtain, and he doesn t bother to pretend that he doesn t know that you know that he knows it s there Instead, he welcomes you into his humble abode, and asks if you wish to hear a story And trust me, reader, you really should say yes Why Why do we want to hear this story from this author, one who breaks off from all conventions in serving us what cannot at all be deemed a novel One hundred and sixty bits and pieces of one, perhaps, but how could that possibly flow as strongly and as soothingly as a single entity, one that admittedly breaks off into chapters but ensures that each chapter is a well rounded stepping stone to the next Instead, we have this book, whose sections sometimes contain nothan a paragraph, a single sentence, even at some point a series of dots or ellipses Impossible to tell How can a story possibly be told in such an erratic and incomprehensible fashion Through conscientious and deliberate interaction of the author with his audience, who predicts their interests and invites them to go beyond them Through knowledgeable understatement, conveying through simple events powerful ideas on life, love, and the death that the author supposedly composes in, without once feeling the need to paint an obvious map for the reader to jerk themselves around on Through a measured and insightful eye on the actions of the main character, creating a man that dwells on deep thoughts without realization and dismisses them for frivolities and pleasure, yet is incontrovertibly shaped by the powerful undertow A man who is both infuriatingly obtuse and startlingly sensitive, capable of both great cruelty and great understanding A man who lived without effort, and died before making an effort A man, now dead, writing of a life that he felt was lived without achieving any measure of great suffering, or amount of great joy.Perhaps he never did acquire those things he longed for so long in life He did, however, find one thing a small amount of truth in his life, one that reconciled his mortality with his visions of success, and contented him with living in constant and clear sighted observation of himself and of others The character may have never realized the beauty of his thoughts, the wonderful philosophies he drew from a privileged, yet empty living I believe, however, that the author trusted us enough to discover those for ourselves However much he played with us during the course of the pages, flattering our sensibilities while baffling our literary conventions, he trusted us to go through his pages and discover something on our own, for our own That something, however small, is worth everything A publica o de Mem rias p stumas de Br s Cubas n o s inaugura o Realismo no Brasil, como inicia a etapa mais complexa da obra de Machado de Assis Com ela, aprofunda se a sua an lise da realidade e refina se a sua linguagem, sendo considerada a obra que prenuncia algumas t cnicas da literatura moderna I wrote it with a playful pen and melancholy ink and it isn t hard to foresee what can come out of that marriage I might add that serious people will find some semblance of a normal novel, while frivolous people won t find their usual one here There it stands, deprived of the esteem of the serious and the love of the frivolous, the two main pillars of opinion Although The Posthumous Memoirs of Br s Cubas are written in a very frolicsome manner the book is abundant in precise and deep observa I wrote it with a playful pen and melancholy ink and it isn t hard to foresee what can come out of that marriage I might add that serious people will find some semblance of a normal novel, while frivolous people won t find their usual one here There it stands, deprived of the esteem of the serious and the love of the frivolous, the two main pillars of opinion Although The Posthumous Memoirs of Br s Cubas are written in a very frolicsome manner the book is abundant in precise and deep observations of human nature So the novel may even be considered as an earthy parable of existence I had a passion for ballyhoo, the limelight, fireworks More modest people will censure me perhaps for this defect I m confident, however, that clever people will recognize this talent of mine So my idea had two faces, like a medal, one turned toward the public and the other toward me On one side philanthropy and profit, on the other a thirst for fame The narration goes as easy and sparkling as a flute of effervescent champagne and it is as much pleasant and inebriating too Men are worth something in different ways, and the surest one of all is being worthy in the opinion of other men We are what we are in the eyes of the others so do never forget to pull the wool over the other people s eyes Note that I m not making a man a simple vehicle of Humanitas He is vehicle, passenger, and coachman all at the same time He is Humanitas itself in a reduced form It follows from that that there is a need for him to worship himself If man couldn t love himself nobody would love him How could I not want to read this First, there is the absolutely gorgeous jacket design, including this painting, Young Man with a Pen by Diego Rivera Second, Mike Puma recommended this Mike is the go to guy for Latin American literature.And then, in an introduction by Bras Cubas , the author announces that he has adopted the free form of a Sterne or a Xavier de Maistre in the writing of these Memoirs.Well, saddle me up and call me Tristram.Machado de Assis has indeed captured Sterne, down t How could I not want to read this First, there is the absolutely gorgeous jacket design, including this painting, Young Man with a Pen by Diego Rivera Second, Mike Puma recommended this Mike is the go to guy for Latin American literature.And then, in an introduction by Bras Cubas , the author announces that he has adopted the free form of a Sterne or a Xavier de Maistre in the writing of these Memoirs.Well, saddle me up and call me Tristram.Machado de Assis has indeed captured Sterne, down to the experimental font and digressions He talks to the reader about what each is doing Although, unlike Sterne, who delightfully talks to a female reader, Machado de Assis here chats with the gentleman reading me But our boy Tristram was well intentioned, even likable The World just befell him Bras Cubas, conversely, is amoral, maybe immoral He was a shitty kid and grew into a rather shitty grown up After his treatment of slaves, women in general, and family members, his late life cuckolding of a friend actually serves as his one vulnerable moment I would recommend this to readers who liked that Sterne changed things, and want to know how writing changed as a result Or if you re just wanting to finally read a Brazilian author.I liked this I liked this, Mike The writing was fine, but the effort did not live up to the promise of the book s beauty Apropos of that nonsensical remark, here is the author s cogitation over a Bibliomaniac The worst part is the absurdity The man stays there, hunched over the page, a lens under his right eye, given over completely to the noble and wearing function of deciphering the absurdity He s already promised himself to write a brief report in which he will relate the finding of the book and the discovery of the sublimity if there is to be one under that obscure phrase In the end he discovers nothing and contents himself with ownership He closes the book, looks at it, looks at it again, goes to the window and holds it up to the sun A one and only copy At that moment, passing under the window is a Caesar or a Cromwell on the path to power He turns his back on him, closes the window, lies down on his hammock, and slowly thumbs through the book, lovingly, wallowing hardA one and only copy Seriously Google Diego Rivera Really amazing paintings I said at the beginning of this review that this is a beautifully designed book The publishers were meticulous in making it so How then, I ask no one in particular, is it possible that they allowed no fewer than 50 typos Some were simple HE instead of THE THE instead of THEY ME instead of MY Something you trip over and immediately right yourself Other obvious typos, however, made whole sentences incomprehensible This recentish GR sensation among my friends the rest of GR can take a hike failed to please me beyond the 166p point There is something about those ponderous nice guy narrators who ruminate on the quotidian in occasionally profound ways that seems to set GR aflame My qualms with the book have been expressed by Nate and Jimmy simply that once the original for 1880 self commenting aspect and short chapter structure is out of the way, the story and its telling are quirky but banal Another lov This recentish GR sensation among my friends the rest of GR can take a hike failed to please me beyond the 166p point There is something about those ponderous nice guy narrators who ruminate on the quotidian in occasionally profound ways that seems to set GR aflame My qualms with the book have been expressed by Nate and Jimmy simply that once the original for 1880 self commenting aspect and short chapter structure is out of the way, the story and its telling are quirky but banal Another lovestruck oaf waffling about how beautiful his angelic beautiful beauty is in all her gorgeosity, padded with otherwise amusing cerebral digressions and quotable bits, followed by MJ snoozing in his comfy king size My sincerest apologies to The Puma Every season of life is an edition that corrects the one before and which will also be corrected itself until the definitive edition, which the publisher gives to the worms gratis.This really speaks to me because I ve gone through like twenty editions of myself not because of demand, just that previous ones were like riddled with typos.I ve read de Assis before, and it s great to revisit his weird, modern style Writing in the late 1800s, De Assis is the Pushkin of Brazil the father of thei Every season of life is an edition that corrects the one before and which will also be corrected itself until the definitive edition, which the publisher gives to the worms gratis.This really speaks to me because I ve gone through like twenty editions of myself not because of demand, just that previous ones were like riddled with typos.I ve read de Assis before, and it s great to revisit his weird, modern style Writing in the late 1800s, De Assis is the Pushkin of Brazil the father of their literature Traces of metafictional Borges and magical realism can be seen He doesn t so much break the fourth wall as refuse to acknowledge its existence His narrators, his world, the very idea that you re reading a book, are all unreliable And now watch the skill, the art with which I make the greatest transition in this book, he says, before making a totally awkward transitionStrip away the tricks and Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas also known as Epitaph of a Small Winner tells a small story A guy leads an uneventful life There s a love interest Stars are crossed The action is conventional But you could say the same about Ulysses, and where would that get you The book isn t about the story it s about the book It s narrated from beyond the grave Bras Cubas rambles, aggrandizes himself, changes his mind Maybe I ll leave out the previous chapter, he says Among other reasons because in the last lines there s a phrase that s close to being nonsense Then he singles you out seventy years from now, you leans over the previous page to see if you can discover the nonsense I laughed because I d just finished doing exactly that I have no way of knowing if Bras Cubas actually did leave the previous chapter out.I like Dom Casmurro best the actual plot engages meBut who am I to say The main defect of this book is you, reader, Bras Cubas warns me Maybe my next edition will do better Strangely fascinating I am no expert in literature and only started reading serious fiction works a couple of years back in my quest to read all those works included in 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die by Dr Boxall.Therefore, at first, I did not know how to react to this kind of literary work Some say it is a novel but the author, the Brazilian Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis 1839 1908 says that is is a memoir However, a memoir is supposed to be fiction But how could this be ficti Strangely fascinating I am no expert in literature and only started reading serious fiction works a couple of years back in my quest to read all those works included in 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die by Dr Boxall.Therefore, at first, I did not know how to react to this kind of literary work Some say it is a novel but the author, the Brazilian Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis 1839 1908 says that is is a memoir However, a memoir is supposed to be fiction But how could this be fiction if it was written by the protagonist, the Brazilian rich and indolent Bras Cubas after his death Dead people cannot write a novel unless they can talk to a writer who will, in trance, tinker what they say on his keyboard for many, many creepy nights De Assis made use of a dead narrator, Bras Cubas, so that he De Assis will have a freedom to say what he wants to say, free from the responsibilities of the living Death offers him the indolence of eternity p 209 The fact of being already deceased allows Br s Cubas to sharply criticize the Brazilian society and reflect on his own disillusionment, with no sign of remorse or fear of retaliationp.52 But in death, what a difference What a release What freedom Oh, how people can shake off their coverings, leave their spangles in the gutter, unbutton themselves, undecorate themselves, confess flatly what they were and what they ve stopped being Because, in short, there aren t any neighbors or friends or enemies or acquintances or strangers There s noaudience The gaze of public opinions, that sharp and judgmental gaze, losses its virtue the moment we tread the territory of death I m not saying that it doesn t reach here and examine and judge us, but we don t care about the examination or judgment My dear living gentlemen and ladies, there s nothing as incommensurable as the disdain of the deceased This however, is not an original idea De Assis himself admitted that this style of freewheeling narrative was inspired by Laurence Sterne 1713 1768 particularly the latter s The Life and Opinions of Tristam Shandy The Afterword of the edition The Library of Latin American series I have says that the De Assis s generation of Brazilian writers were greatly influenced by French earlier masters This was during the middle 19th century when Brazil veered away from Portugal that was their main ally and greatly influenced their country prior to its opening to European countries.The setting is in Rio de Janeiro, during that period, i.e., mid 19th century The novel opens with the actual interment of tne 64 y o Bras Cubas who ironically died of pneumonia after discovering an antihypochodriacal poultice medicine He started to tell his tale from childhood, through his series of failed love affairs, his attempt to become a politician, etc up to his eventual death.The book is divided into several short erratic chapters shifting in tone and style My favorite is XXXI entitled The Black Butterfuly The scene is after the death of Bras Cubas s mother and he was visited by a black butterfly Bras is not superstitious so he strikes the poor butterfly with a towel while on top of his father s portrait with a towel In the Philippines, we all believe that a butterfly or even a dragonfly, in whatever color, appearing after the death of a loved one is actually the soul of that person I remember that a brown dragonfly stayed on the windshield of my car few days after the death of my father in September 1997 That dragonfly stayed there on top of my sideview mirror while I was traversing the lenght of the South Expressway SLEX not minding the strong wind and dusts The unique use of erratic chapters shifting in tone and style in this realist novel that also uses surreal devices of metaphor and playful narrative construction source Wiki , at times can also be confusing What is funny is that De Assis anticipated this by including a short chapter LXXI entitled The Defect of this BookI m beginning to regret this book Not that it bores me, I have nothing to do and, really, putting together a few meager chapters for that other world is always a task that distracts me from eternity a little But the book is tedious, it has the smell of grave about it it has a certain cadeveric contraction about it, a serious fault, insignificant to boot because the main defect of this book is you, reader You re in a hurry to grow old and the book moves slowly You love direct and continuous narration, a regular and fluid style, and this book and my style are like drunkards, they stagger left and right, they walk and stop, mumble, yell, cackle, shake their fists at the sky, stumble, and fallAnd they do fall Miserable leaves of cypress of death, you shall fall like any others, beautiful and brilliant as you are And, if I had eyes, I would shed a nostalgic tear for you This is the great adventure of death, which if it leaves no mouth with which to laugh, neither does it leave eyes with which to weep You shall failIf you don t find those lines strangely fascinating, I don t know what lines in any other book would have that impact to you.My edition of this book was published by The Library of Latin America Their series of books makes available in translation major nineteen century authors whose work has been neglected in the English speaking world.I am thankful to The Library of Latin America for bringing De Assis available to English only readers like me I look forward to knowingobscure Latin American writers like the brilliant Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis Saludos, Senor De Assis