Free ePUB The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred YearsAuthor Chingiz Aitmatov – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

Set in the vast windswept Central Asian steppes and the infinite reaches of galactic space, this powerful novel offers a vivid view of the culture and values of the Soviet Union s Central Asian peoples


10 thoughts on “The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years

  1. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years, Chingiz AitmatovThe Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years, originally published in Russian in the Novy Mir literary magazine in 1980, is a novel written by the Kyrgyz author Chinghiz Aitmatov.The novel begins with Yedigei learning about the death of his longtime friend, Kazangap All of Kazangap s crucial relatives have been forewarned of his impending death, and it is decided to set off to bury him the next day To the consterna The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years, Chingiz AitmatovThe Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years, originally published in Russian in the Novy Mir literary magazine in 1980, is a novel written by the Kyrgyz author Chinghiz Aitmatov.The novel begins with Yedigei learning about the death of his longtime friend, Kazangap All of Kazangap s crucial relatives have been forewarned of his impending death, and it is decided to set off to bury him the next day To the consternation of his son, Sabitzhan, who is indifferent toward his father s burial, it is decided to travel across the Sarozek to the Ana Beiit cemetery in order to bury Kazangap The procession promptly leaves the next morning, and experiences that took place throughout Yedigei s lifetime, as well as various Sarozek legends, are recollected.Initially, Yedigei recalls how he had fought in World War II but had been dismissed from duty due to shell shock As a result, he was sent to work on the railway Through his work, he met Kazangap, who convinced him to move to what would become his permanent home, the remote Boranly Burannyi junction, from which he gained his namesake Kazangap and Yedigei become dear friends, and Kazangap eventually gives Yedigei the gift of a camel, named Karanar, which becomes legendary across the Sarozek because of its strength and vitality.At the end of 1951, Abutalip and Zaripa Kuttybaev move to Boranly Burranyi junction with their two young sons They initially have a hard time adjusting to living on the Sarozek because of the harsh environment however, they eventually become adjusted Before relocating, both had been school teachers Abutalip also fought in the war and had been taken prisoner by the Germans, but he escaped and fought with the Yugoslav partisan army Nevertheless, upon his return to the Soviet Union he still retained the stigma of having been a prisoner of war and was often relocated because of political reasons 1986 1364 452


  2. Karl Schmiedeskamp Karl Schmiedeskamp says:

    This is easily in the top ten of best books I have ever read Aitmatov is an over looked genius While the translation I read is less than the best, there are passages so lyrical they could easily pass for poetry.I attempted to give a review of the book to my Toastmasters Club and discovered that it is simply too complex and filled with layers of meaning to cover in a 7 minute speech I cannot do it justice here I will just note that anyone interested in any of the following will like this book This is easily in the top ten of best books I have ever read Aitmatov is an over looked genius While the translation I read is less than the best, there are passages so lyrical they could easily pass for poetry.I attempted to give a review of the book to my Toastmasters Club and discovered that it is simply too complex and filled with layers of meaning to cover in a 7 minute speech I cannot do it justice here I will just note that anyone interested in any of the following will like this book Soviet History from World War II to the 1970s.Central Asia especially in the Soviet EraIslam in Central Asia.Love Death Sounds like a Woody Allen movie, huh Growing old.Hope DespairThe Space race.Like any great book, One Day Lasts More Than 100 Years, is mot a difficult read It carries the reader on the flow of the narrative The hard part comes when you realize you are nearing the last page and will have to go to work to integrate all of what you ve read into your consciousness,


  3. Naeem Naeem says:

    In the semester of 9 11, I was teaching International Conflict It was one of the best set of students I ever had One of them, Kydr from Kyrgyzstan whom I met again one day inside the Blue Masjid in Istanbul gave me this book to read He said it was one of the best books by a world class writer I had my doubts But then I read it And wow In part its a homage to to Gabriel Garcia Marquez But mostly it is about the encounter between the traditional cultures conquered first by Russia and In the semester of 9 11, I was teaching International Conflict It was one of the best set of students I ever had One of them, Kydr from Kyrgyzstan whom I met again one day inside the Blue Masjid in Istanbul gave me this book to read He said it was one of the best books by a world class writer I had my doubts But then I read it And wow In part its a homage to to Gabriel Garcia Marquez But mostly it is about the encounter between the traditional cultures conquered first by Russia and then by the USSR and the modernity that this conquering brought I have sometimes thought that Achebe s Things Fall Apart is the only plot that 3rd worlders writers write Here is a version of it But the details are utterly different And so is the spirit of the prose This book takes you there in time and place


  4. Eldonfoil TH*E Whatever Champion Eldonfoil TH*E Whatever Champion says:

    A fervent tale that reveals just how real, how surreal, how drastic, the gap is between modern and traditional lifestyles The prose, the imagery, and the outcome of this story transport me to a discarded, burnt out, rusting hull of a train, plane, or submarine at the banks of a receding sea, invisible radiation raining down, the last pick of cotton long gone from an abused land How far is it then to find beauty in a simple hut or the explosion of fresh yogurt on your tongue


  5. Alex Alex says:

    There are actually people who rated this book 1 star For me it is one of the best books I have ever read It is so simple and yet so powerful.A very very very strong recommendation.I would say, it is a book of practical philosophy.


  6. Ruslan Georgiev Ruslan Georgiev says:

    This is the third novel I ve read by the Kyrgyz writer and again he manages to make me fall in love in his characters and narrative There is something special and unique in Aitmatov s writing that I seldom see in other authors I especially admire is his skill to describe nature and use is to crate emotional atmosphere and evoke feelings He has the ability to write beyond time and space by using grounds common for all human beings He makes us realize that we are not so much different than the This is the third novel I ve read by the Kyrgyz writer and again he manages to make me fall in love in his characters and narrative There is something special and unique in Aitmatov s writing that I seldom see in other authors I especially admire is his skill to describe nature and use is to crate emotional atmosphere and evoke feelings He has the ability to write beyond time and space by using grounds common for all human beings He makes us realize that we are not so much different than the people from the remote Boranly Burannyi junction situated somewhere in the Kazakh steppes


  7. Czarny Pies Czarny Pies says:

    Read this book I mean really how often do you get at chance to read a book set in Kyrgyzstan written by a Kyrgyz Last summer at the cottage I cut myself while sawing wood for my sauna The Doctor who sewed me up had been raised and educated in Kyrgyzstan Her opinion of me went up when I was able to tell her that I had read this book.I doubt that many GoodReads members need to knowabout life on Park Avenue or Nob Hill than they currently do Most however are likely to lack any knowledge Read this book I mean really how often do you get at chance to read a book set in Kyrgyzstan written by a Kyrgyz Last summer at the cottage I cut myself while sawing wood for my sauna The Doctor who sewed me up had been raised and educated in Kyrgyzstan Her opinion of me went up when I was able to tell her that I had read this book.I doubt that many GoodReads members need to knowabout life on Park Avenue or Nob Hill than they currently do Most however are likely to lack any knowledge of Kyrgyzstan This is a good book that will help you make new friends sooner or later


  8. Emma Deplores childrens-cookbooks.co Censorship Emma Deplores childrens-cookbooks.co Censorship says:

    This is exactly the sort of book I was hoping to find when I started my world fiction challenge a truly excellent and accessible novel that deserves to be muchwidely read Fiction in translation covers a wide spectrum, sometimes feeling very foreign and bizarre, but there s something wonderful and life affirming about finding a book like this, that s perfectly relatable and understandable despite for most English speaking readers an enormous cultural gap.The book is about an old man nam This is exactly the sort of book I was hoping to find when I started my world fiction challenge a truly excellent and accessible novel that deserves to be muchwidely read Fiction in translation covers a wide spectrum, sometimes feeling very foreign and bizarre, but there s something wonderful and life affirming about finding a book like this, that s perfectly relatable and understandable despite for most English speaking readers an enormous cultural gap.The book is about an old man named Yedigei, who works at a tiny railway junction out in the empty steppe of Kazakhstan His oldest friend, Kazangap, dies at the beginning of the book, and Yedigei leads the other men of the junction out to an ancient cemetery for the burial On their trip to the cemetery, he reminisces about his life, particularly about an ill fated family he grew close to in the 1950s There are also a couple of folk tales included, as well as a science fiction subplot about a first contact with an alien civilization Which may sound like a lot, but it all comes together very well even the sci fi bit, which seemed clumsy until its thematic reason for being in the story became clear.Overall, this is simply an excellent book It s a compelling story, featuring interesting, three dimensional characters The evocative writing brings to life a remote corner of the world, and the translation, including the dialogue, is very readable without being dumbed down The author incorporates a lot of 20th century Soviet history while still keeping the focus on the characters It s also definitely a big ideas kind of book, with a lot to say about cultural memory, international relations, and the Soviet system among other things , but again, Aitmatov manages this in a subtle, nondidactic way, keeping the primary focus on the characters and their story.I regret that my Russian isn t nearly up to reading novels, because had I read this in the original, it likely would have gotten 5 stars As is, the language is quite good, and so it s a very solid 4.5 It would have been nice had the foreword beenabout providing the reader with helpful background information like where in Kazakhstan this actually takes place and less about its writer showing off, but as for the novel itself, I have no complaints Definitely recommended if you can get your hands on a copy


  9. Eric Eric says:

    This novel was reommended to me by an Israeli friend which is a little odd as it was written by Soviet Kirghiz the Turkic people of the Soviet Union who are principally Muslim about a Kazakhstan Muslim While religion does not play a major role in the novel, it seems to be always in the background The novel is about a lot of different forms of prejudice against prisoners of war an interesting historical event from WWII , against creative artists mainly writers , against higher intelligenc This novel was reommended to me by an Israeli friend which is a little odd as it was written by Soviet Kirghiz the Turkic people of the Soviet Union who are principally Muslim about a Kazakhstan Muslim While religion does not play a major role in the novel, it seems to be always in the background The novel is about a lot of different forms of prejudice against prisoners of war an interesting historical event from WWII , against creative artists mainly writers , against higher intelligence, and against open communications Yedigei is a compelling protagonist we read of many major events of his life that help develop an understanding of the man he had become at the time of the novel a man trying to reconcile and comprehend his older age and ultimate death Ultimately my favorite lines which protray Yedigei s supreme practical wisdom are I am just a man I think as best as I can


  10. Marc Gerstein Marc Gerstein says:

    Early on, I thought I was going to absolutely love this book, but it didn t last.It started as a two plot novel One involved the death of a respected elder at a remote very, very remote Soviet railway junction and the efforts by Yeidigei, his close friend, to brings the body fur burial at a distant cemetery that holds meaning for the tied to the region The other plot involves a joint U.S Soviet space mission that isI really don t want to spoil this.Seemed to me like like an odd juxta Early on, I thought I was going to absolutely love this book, but it didn t last.It started as a two plot novel One involved the death of a respected elder at a remote very, very remote Soviet railway junction and the efforts by Yeidigei, his close friend, to brings the body fur burial at a distant cemetery that holds meaning for the tied to the region The other plot involves a joint U.S Soviet space mission that isI really don t want to spoil this.Seemed to me like like an odd juxtaposition traditional thing along the lines of Faulkner s As I Lay Dying which also involved transporting a corpse for burial but had quite a lot in it andhumor than you d expect from a story line like this intertwined with the kind of science fiction writing I most admire straightforward, no obsession gee whiz look what I can conjure up techno toys, and a relevant political theme Not sure how it would all connect, but what the heck an author need not reveal all in the early stages I was all in Hooked and eager to go further.That loud thud you may heave heard was really my great expectations plunging to the ground in a dead heap.I suppose a high school student assigned an essay could squeeze out 150 words or so on the way the two plots connected, but I d excuse that knowing how important it is to do what the teacher wants and get a decent grade But really, they never connect, at least not in athan trivial way at the every end.And contrary to my initial assumption, this wasn t a multi plot novel The sci fi story quickly petered out and died and like the deceased elder, got a disappointing burial at the end This was really a one plot novel all the way And as it turned out, it didn t hold a candle to As I Lay Dying The funeral procession was just a literary jumping off point for what I suppose was the real novel, the story of Yedidigei and the remote railway junction in which he lives with injection of some older folk stories from the region It s not as if this was awful There was interest to it How could there not be dealing with all that went on in Stalin land But it just seemed to drag on for manypages than was warranted by the material, especially the amount of paper and ink devoted to the rebellion of the rambunctious camel I know that this book is a Goodreads superstar, judging by the prevalence of five star reviews, including two from folks I know in real life I don t know Maybe I d have beensatisfied had Aitmatov not built up a big sci fi expectation early on only to leave me increasingly frustrated and irritated as his failure to deliver dragged on and on and on