{download eBook} Baltasar and BlimundaAuthor José Saramago – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

King John V the Magnanimous of Portugal is a frustrated man, to continue the royal dynasty children are obviously needed, set back in the year of our Lord, 1711 married two years to the devout Austrian Princess Maria Ana, and yet no babies At twenty one, the good looking monarch feels a little insulted, because of his failures, but the House of Braganza will eventually rule for almost 300 years, this small still wealthy land then, and besides other women have proven it s not his fault King John V the Magnanimous of Portugal is a frustrated man, to continue the royal dynasty children are obviously needed, set back in the year of our Lord, 1711 married two years to the devout Austrian Princess Maria Ana, and yet no babies At twenty one, the good looking monarch feels a little insulted, because of his failures, but the House of Braganza will eventually rule for almost 300 years, this small still wealthy land then, and besides other women have proven it s not his fault So when a Franciscan St.Francis friar promises that God will grant the King his wish, through their prayers, if a convent, monastery is built for that religious order, John the Fifth agrees readily as soon as the Queen gives birth happily, it occurs later in the year just a daughter though, but next time a glorious sonThe vast Portuguese Empire in Asia, Africa and South America is very rich, money keeps flowing into the royal treasury, they are the envy of the rest of Europe, the all powerful king can do anything he wants Mafra, a small town about 17 miles outside Lisbon is chosen for the project s site, at the lower end of the totem pole is an ex, disabled soldier by the name of Baltasar Mateus, nicknamed Seven Suns He fought for his Royal Highness against arch enemy Spain, leaving his left hand somewhere in that country, but the authorities have short memories, the patriot has no value to them now He meets a young woman in magnificent Lisbon, by the name of Blimunda, not the most romantic enjoyable event, her disturbed mother found guilty of heresy, is being exiled to Angola, in Africa, but first a public flogging, seen by thousands of curious people, she will never return home, it s the time of the Inquisition Baltasar has been trying hopelessly, to get a government pension in the city, with the help of Padre Bartolomeu Lourenco a historical figure, known as the Flying Man because he was building a fantastic flying machine, the young King is strangely supporting this bold endeavor The former soldier had become friends with the brilliant, yet unstable priest, the two Baltasar and Blimunda, help assemble the flying machine for the padre Still rulers don t like to give money away, no pension so the new couple decide to go back to Mafra Baltasar home town, his good parents and sister live there and greet him with tears in their eyes, after so many long years apart Imagine, 45,000 workers employed in this massive project, building an enormous monastery which is constantly gets bigger and bigger, the King is like a kid in a candy shop, never mind the expense he can t help himself, a fabulous palace for the royals also will be erected, even a poor, one handed man can get a paying job here By the way, the intelligent Blimunda has a dark secret she can see inside the bodies of people, with X ray eyes and check their health, if found out by the notorious Inquisition she ll be inevitably burned at the stake, as a witch A superior novel , for anyone who likes historical fiction, very well written a gem The sumptuous National Palace is still standing Baltasar and Blimundarevolves around the construction of the monumental monastery in Mafra, an effect of slyness of the Franciscans and vanity of the king of Portugal, Joao V Thousands labouring workers to satisfy the morbid ambitions of monks and pamper bloated ego of the king remind us of builders pyramids in antiquity Is it the ancient Egypt or the Catholic Portugal pride of kings and hypocrisy of clergy seems to be unchanged for centuries Marriage of the altar and the throne always looBaltasar and Blimundarevolves around the construction of the monumental monastery in Mafra, an effect of slyness of the Franciscans and vanity of the king of Portugal, Joao V Thousands labouring workers to satisfy the morbid ambitions of monks and pamper bloated ego of the king remind us of builders pyramids in antiquity Is it the ancient Egypt or the Catholic Portugal pride of kings and hypocrisy of clergy seems to be unchanged for centuries Marriage of the altar and the throne always looked the same and the little people as ever were losers People would kneel before the king, the bishop, the altar, the procession, the image of a saint They would kneel so often that actually did not get up from their knees at all.Saramago is wonderfully ironic and blasphemous And equally ruthless towards monarchy and clergy He s irreverent when with wry humour is stigmatizing their sanctimony, greed, lecherousness and stupidity, he s sarcastic describing endless ceremonials, the institution of the saints and indulgences, and, what a heresy , doubting in the divine order of the world Meanwhile in the background unfolds unusual story, love of the crippled soldier Baltasar and daughter of woman condemned for witchcraft, Blimunda and their relationship with Padre Bartolemeu Louren o who dreams of building passarola, the flying machine To deny the law of gravity, soar where angels tread, look into the face of God Indeed, rather dangerous chimera in the time of the InquisitionBaltasar and Blimunda , alternately brutally realistic and wonderfully magical, you can hear echo of magical realism here is a remarkable tale Saramago s style is quite distinguishable, extremely long, complex sentences, often without punctuation, with two narrators all at once It requires a lot of concentration but it s highly original and rewarding reading Saramago perfectly balanced insatiable hunger for knowledge and questioning the established order of the world with power of love and man s character to create a powerful and visionary story of the human determination to pursue their dreams, overcome own limitations and rise above dreariness in times when life did not mean too much and people were burning like torches.4.5 5 If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Et ego in illo Baltasar and Blimunda by Jos Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero Translator If Adam was punished for wishing to resemble God, how do men come to have God inside them without being punished, and even when they do not wish to receive Him they go unpunished, for to have and not to wish to have God inside oneself amounts to the same absurdity, and the same impossible situation, yet the words Et ego in illo imply that God is in If you re into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Et ego in illo Baltasar and Blimunda by Jos Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero Translator If Adam was punished for wishing to resemble God, how do men come to have God inside them without being punished, and even when they do not wish to receive Him they go unpunished, for to have and not to wish to have God inside oneself amounts to the same absurdity, and the same impossible situation, yet the words Et ego in illo imply that God is inside me, how did I come to find myself in thus labyrinth of yes and no, of no that means yes, of yes that means no, opposed affinities allied contradictions, how shall I pass safely over the edge of the razor, well, summing up, before Christ became man, God was outside man and could not reside in him, then, through the Blessed Sacrament, He came to be inside man, so man is virtually God, or will ultimately become God, yes, of course, if God resides in me, I am God, I am God not in triune or quadruple, but one, one with God, He is I, I am He, Durus est hic sermo, et quis potest eum audire In Baltasar and Blimunda by Jos Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero translator Se a Ad o por querer assemelhar se a Deus, como t m agora os homens a Deus dentro de si e n o s o castigados, ou o n o querem receber e castigados n o s o, que ter e n o querer ter Deus dentro de si o mesmo absurdo, a mesma impossibilidade, e contudo Et ego in illo, Deus est em mim, ou em mim n o est Deus, como poderei achar me nesta floresta de sim e n o, de n o que sim, do sim que n o, afinidades contr rias, contrariedades afins como atravessarei salvo sobre o fio da navalha, ora, resumindo agora, antes de Cristo se ter feito homem, Deus estava fora do homem e n o podia estar nele, depois, pelo Sacramento, passou a estar nele, assim o homem quase Deus, ou ser afinal o pr prio Deus, sim, sim, se em mim est Deus, eu sou Deus, sou o de modo n o trino ou qu druplo, mas uno, uno com Deus, Deus n s, ele eu, eu ele, Durus est hic sermo, et quis potest eum audire In Memorial do Convento by Jos Saramago Arriving in Mafra, let us imagine ourselves as part of the crowd that, on October 22, 1730, attended the consecration of the convent Impossible not to be impressed by this fa adethan 230 meters in length To the centre, the basilica with its dome and bell towers, and on each side the imposing turrets The portico columns clearly showed the neoclassical influence, complemented by several sculptures in the same style Saramago tells us that 40,000 workers worked night and day so that the Basilica could be finished on D Jo o V s birthday The tale is mesmerizing and it casted its spells on me straight away The ear has to be educated if one wishes to appreciate musical sounds, just as the eyes must learn to distinguish the value of words Baltasar and Blimunda, written in the genre of magical realism combined with an acute social drama, is like the magic music and it is full of miraculous mysticism of words and deeds.Today s bread does not eliminate yesterday s hunger, much less that of tomorrow Baltasar and Blimunda is about the i The tale is mesmerizing and it casted its spells on me straight away The ear has to be educated if one wishes to appreciate musical sounds, just as the eyes must learn to distinguish the value of words Baltasar and Blimunda, written in the genre of magical realism combined with an acute social drama, is like the magic music and it is full of miraculous mysticism of words and deeds.Today s bread does not eliminate yesterday s hunger, much less that of tomorrow Baltasar and Blimunda is about the insatiable hunger of great love and the insatiable hunger for knowledge.The unknown beckons I have always thought that one must be full of a creative madness to write the way it is composed this novel It is a sheer original, brilliant and spellbound novel I was tightly and irrevocably encapsulated by the read from page one And for sure it didn t have anything to do with the full moon phenomenon which was happening just this very last weekend by the time I actually finished it.What a better start of the novel than by writing of this early 18th century Lisbon royal atmosphere Dom Jo I have always thought that one must be full of a creative madness to write the way it is composed this novel It is a sheer original, brilliant and spellbound novel I was tightly and irrevocably encapsulated by the read from page one And for sure it didn t have anything to do with the full moon phenomenon which was happening just this very last weekend by the time I actually finished it.What a better start of the novel than by writing of this early 18th century Lisbon royal atmosphere Dom Joao, the 5th monarch so named on the royal list, will pay a visit this night to the bedchamber of the Queen, Dona Maria Ana Josefa, who arrivedthan two years ago from Austria to provide heirs for the Portuguese crown, and so far has shown no signs of becoming pregnant Already there are rumors at court, both within and without the royal palace, that the Queen is barren, an insinuation that is carefully guarded from hostile ears and tongues and confided only to intimates That anyone should blame the King is unthinkable, first because infertility is an evil that befalls not men but women, who for that very reason are often disowned and second, because there is material evidence, should such a thing be necessary, in the horde of bastards produced by the royal semen, who populate the kingdom and even at this moment are forming a procession in the square Moreover, it is not the King but the Queen who spends all her time in prayer, beseeching a child from heaven, for two good reasons The first reason is that a king, especially a king of Portugal, does not ask for something that he alone can provide, and the second reason is that a woman is essentially a vessel made to be filled, a natural supplicant, whether she pleads in novenas or in occasional prayers But neither the perseverance of the King who, unless there is some canonical or physiological impediment, vigorously performs his royal duty twice weekly, nor the patience and humility of the Queen, who, besides praying, subjects herself to total immobility after her husband s withdrawal, so that their generative secretions may fertilize undisturbed, her scant from a lack of incentive and time, and because of her deep moral scruples, the King s prodigious, as one might expect from a man who is not yet 22 years of age, neither the one factor nor the other has succeeded so far in causing Dona Maria Ana s womb to become swollen Yet God is almighty What I am very sure as much as a human being can be that I m going to remember in a couple of years from this reading is the purely amazing, earthy but also celestial love affair between the two main protagonists unfortunately the 3rd main personage Padre Bartolomeu Lourenco de Gusmao who colored something like a one quarter of the book died far too soon to make a further strong impression but I ve missed him even so, he was an extremely brilliant mind for his living times Baltasar and Blimunda two vagabonds, he a former soldier from a war that left him a disabled man without his left hand, and she, a clairvoyant, a girl with supernatural powers, who can see into things and people if fasting was done, two people who are full of eccentricities and have, from time to time, conversations about transcendental things The story gravitates around the creation and building of a Flying machine the so called beloved Passarola , enterprise which eventually comes to a successful fruition and, which is going to lead to some dramatic consequences for this trinity of airship inventors, and, on a larger scale, on the construction and erecting of the convent of Mafra, a highly ambitious and hard labouring project which affects eventually the overall population of the country, because events are always interconnected and no one can escape from the eye of the Church with the high supervision of the Holy Office of the Inquisition and the State as per the King s decrees for it is a well known fact that the ear has to be educated if one wishes to appreciate musical sounds, just as the eyes must learn to distinguish the value of words and the way in which they are combined when one is reading a text, and the hearing must be trained for one to comprehend speech, These weighty words moderate my frivolous remarks, for it is a common failing among men to say what they believe others wish to hear them say, without sticking to the truth, however, for men to be able to stick to the truth, they must first acknowledge their errors, And commit them, That is a question I couldn t answer with a simple yes or no, but I do believe in the necessity of error we never ask ourselves whether there might not be some wisdom in madness, even while recognizing that we are all a little mad These are ways of keeping firmly on this side of madness, and just imagine, what would happen if madmen demanded to be treated as if they were equals with the sane, who are only a little mad, on the pretext that they themselves still possess a little wisdom, so as to safeguard, for example, their own existence I ve found thoroughly absorbing the whole exuberance of the baroque narrative, blended with cascading discourses and meditations on human existence, religion, criss crossed questions between intellect and faith on life s governing, all flavoured by a comedy, erudite, sometimes surreal writing style of counting the stories that make up for people s lives In the end, Always as something, never as everything, and never as nothing For, after all, we can escape from everything, but not from ourselves.My first encounter with the Portuguese Jose Saramago, winner of the Nobel prize for literature in 1998, proved to be a perfect match, reading wise Enjoyed myself way too much and above of what I can further add here in Basically, I fully agree with the author s statement saying that the world has been blissfully mad ever since it was conceived 5.0 Before I explain my feelings about Saramago s Baltasar and Blimunda, let me share a couple visuals from the late 17th a 5 star like no other that I ve rated,Baltasar and Blimundais historical fiction at its base, but a satirica 5.0 Before I explain my feelings about Saramago s Baltasar and Blimunda, let me share a couple visuals from the late 17th 18th Century that are highlighted within the text The passarola of Father Bartholomeu de GusmaoAn auto de fe of the Portugeuse InquisitionSaramago s masterpiece.343 pages Perhaps, the longest 343 pages I ve ever tried to read, but very fulfilling in the end a 5 star like no other that I ve rated,Baltasar and Blimundais historical fiction at its base, but a satirical fairy tale concerning the hypocritical piety in early Modern Europe at its crux.The language and prose is not only shockingly comical speaking of the queen as merely a receptacle for reproduction , but philosophical, brutal and beautiful Also, with his usual non quotation dialogue, it makes it a bit dense and a slow read, but if you like Saramago, you know what to expect.In some parts, it feels slightly tedious due to the language, but in actuality it s the reader who needs to have patience it will work itself out The character development is superb and nothing is left to wonder, which, for this tale, is perfect The ending is surprising, but fits I can easily see how nobel committee members would award him the prize from this work alone I picked up this book while traveling through Portugal this fall Last summer, I read my first Saramango book, Blindness, and loved it Walking along the riverfront in Lisbon, I ran into the Jos Saramango Foundation where there was an exhibit on his work and that of the famous Brazilian author Jorge Amado It was as though I were a kid in a candy store There were thousands of Saramango books in the library, and the bookshop carried many of his major works unfortunately, it only had one in en I picked up this book while traveling through Portugal this fall Last summer, I read my first Saramango book, Blindness, and loved it Walking along the riverfront in Lisbon, I ran into the Jos Saramango Foundation where there was an exhibit on his work and that of the famous Brazilian author Jorge Amado It was as though I were a kid in a candy store There were thousands of Saramango books in the library, and the bookshop carried many of his major works unfortunately, it only had one in english I asked the attendant which was her favorite and she said, without hesitation, Memorial do Convento the original title for Baltasar and Blimunda This was, per her knowledge, what made Saramango famous in Portugal I picked up a Spanish translation, as my knowledge of Portuguese is nonexistent The Memorial do Convento is a wonderful portrait of eighteenth century Portugal As in the typical Saramango style, there is a mixture of reality, history, fantasy, humor, and endless descriptions of contextual facts and surroundings For those new to Saramango, there will be the initial uphill battle of deciphering and decoding sentences four or five pages long, a lack of paragraph indentation and periods, and a plethora of commas separating dialogues, questions, and answers, of one to various characters Saramango leaves it up to the reader to identify the speaker Sometimes, one has to finish a pages long sentence and re read it to finally grasp the idea, all this being a surprisingly addictive exercise of the mind I must confess, though, that I found his complex style frustrating initially I blamed the translations so far I have read Blindness in French and this one in Spanish and often doubted my capacity to understand what I read After finally overcoming these frustrations, I must confess that I am now totally hooked on this style How can I go back to reading orthodox literature with beautiful, easy, and predictable punctuation long pauses to rest the mind between paragraphs and take a breath between numbered chapters as opposed to this breathless marathon of words, flight of ideas, numerous characters and circumstances dancing around endlessly between commas, and the constant demand to figure out who said what or whether it happens now, it already happened, it will never happen, or is it only a dream Without a doubt, I will choose the latter a thousand times over After reading this book, I feel as though I had lived in Portugal in the 1700 s Saramango s treatment of five distinct but intertwined themes, including history, personal relationships, socio economic struggle, religion and persecution, and magic is impeccable The love story is real, poetic, passionate, romantic, transcendental, and even eternal a beautiful tool for linking the unbelievable, the ugly, the cruel, the unjust, the hopeful, the scientific, the despicable, the surreal, and the downright mad A book that will definitively leave you thinking and thirsty for Memorial del conventoI often thought that books can inspire you to travel But these last two books by Saramago, El a o de la muerte de Ricardo Reis and Memorial del convento have given me a different feeling After traveling to Portugal last year, both books have become evenreal after seeing many of the places visited Both books have painted different periods of history in Portugal, the early twentieth century in Ricardo Reis the early eighteenth century in Memorial Both are amazin Memorial del conventoI often thought that books can inspire you to travel But these last two books by Saramago, El a o de la muerte de Ricardo Reis and Memorial del convento have given me a different feeling After traveling to Portugal last year, both books have become evenreal after seeing many of the places visited Both books have painted different periods of history in Portugal, the early twentieth century in Ricardo Reis the early eighteenth century in Memorial Both are amazing tales of the human spirit and I read both in Spanish apologies for not reading in Portugueseit does take awhile to master another language.A special thanks to Jo o Carlos for sending me the top twenty five Portuguese Books Memorial do Convento rings in at number eight and I can see why.In its heart, this is a love story between Baltazar and Blimunda also the title in English Baltazar is a soldier who lost his left hand after the war, returns to Lisbon where he meets Blimunda, who just had her mother sent away to Angola This is the time of the Inquisition auto de f and crowds are needed to see the latest victims two women are also burned to death Both have lost something and their love begins immediately Blimunda has the ability to see inside a person and needs to eat bread before opening her eyes every morning Is she a witch A non believer They become inseparable They are given nicknames, Baltazar is Seven Suns because he can see clearly Blimunda is Seven Moons because she she can see in the dark During the night the sun and moon embrace, while the stars turn slowly in the sky The Moon, from where you came the Sun, to where you are going T eres Sietesoles porque ves a las claras, t ser s Sietelunas porque ves a oscuras, y as , Blimunda, que hasta entonces s lo se llamaba, como su madre, de Jes s, acab siendo Sietelunas, y bien bautizada estaba, que el bautismo fue de cura, no un apodo cualquiera Durmieron aquella noche los soles y las lunas abrazados, mientras giraban las estrellas lentamente en el cielo, Luna d nde est s, Sol, ad nde vas P 107 You can t getbeautiful than this Wrapped around this couple are two other stories the building of the Convent at Mafra and the concept of the passarola, one of the earliest flying machines The spectacular convent was built by King Jo o V when the queen bore him a daughter Baltazar gets work at the convent and Saramago spares nothing describing the brutal job for thousands to build this massive project It made many employees and yet the hardships were many Under Saramago s acute and often sarcastic eyes I have to admit that I took on a new respect for many of the landmarks that I saw in Europe The king utters, Give to Caesar what is from God and give to God what is from Caesar and after we will tally the money, some for me, some for God Di al C sar lo que es de Dios, y a Dios lo que es del C sar, despu s haremos las cuentas y partiremos el dinero, un chavo para ti, otro para m , en verdad os digo y dir , Y Yo, vuestro rey, de Portugal p.190 Or when the German architect addresses the wealth of the king, he notes the endless money entering the mouth and leaving eso es lo qu pasa en Portugal, que es un saco sin fondo, le entera el dinero por la boca y le sale por el culo p 349 Perhaps less of a beautiful sight.The passarola was designed by the brilliant Brazilian priest Bartolomeu Louren o de Gusm o This fabulous work of ingenuity is featured as a drawing by Saramago on the cover a strange bird like contraption that also becomes the heart of the story Add to the mix, the Italian composer Domenico Scarlatti and this wonderful play with music, science and art intertwine in one of the most enchanting parts of the book The priest s religious comparison pokes fun at the holy trinity, now Baltazar, Blimunda and Bartolomeu himself the three B s , El cura se acerc a ellos y se abraz tambi n, s bitamente perturbado por una analog a, as lo hab a dicho el italiano, Dios l mismo, Baltasar su hijo, Blimundo el Esp ritu Santo, y estaban los tres en el cielo, S lo hay un Dios, grit , por el viento le arrebat las palabras de la boca p 239 Saramago has fun with us with his commentary and off the cuff remarks throughout the book is what elevates this book There are very serious sides throughout The plight of a woman, especially towards the queen, the horror to be the queen, for the grief to be a woman, for the shame, this life that is and for the death that comes por el horror de ser reina, por el dolor de ser mujer, por las dos penas juntos, por esta vida que se va, por esa muerte que viene p 135 or when the teen princess on route to wed her Spanish prince is rebuked by her mother, the queen, Oh mother, how good it is to be born To be born is to die, the queen responds And with a dash, How good to have those philosophical debates on long journey Oh, madre, qu es nacer, Nacer es morir, Mar a B rbara Lo mejor de los viajes largos son estos filos ficos debates p.388 Royalty, religion and the plight of the common worker are always at odds and yet, Saramago doesn t entrench us, he just makes us aware of the issues Through the dark period of the inquisition, the new wealth brought in from the colonies enabled this period of tremendous economic growth in Portugal This are changing But at the heart are people and this fantastical story is about the lovers, a flying machine, a convent and music His language yes in Spanish is some of the best I have read Easy, long, poetic, reflective verses makes this book hum along at a leisure pace Truly one of my most enjoyable reads in a very long time From the recipient of theNobel Prize in Literature, a brilliantenchanting novel New York Times Book Review of romance, deceit, religion, and magic set in eighteenth century Portugal at the height of the Inquisition National bestseller Translated by Giovanni PontieroWhen King and Church exercise absolute power what happens to the dreams of ordinary people In early eighteenth century Lisbon, Baltasar, a soldier who has lost a hand in battle, falls in love with Blimunda, a young girl with strange visionary powers From the day that he follows her home from the auto da fe where her mother is condemned and sent into exile, the two are bound body and soul by a love of unassailable strength A third party shares their supper that evening Padre Bartolemeu Louren o, whose fantasy is to invent a flying machine As the inquisition rages and royalty and religion clash, they pursue his impossible, not to mention heretical, dream of flight I love almost everything related to the European Middle Ages and this novel was one of the best I ve ever encountered on the topic It helped me exploreabout Portuguese culture, as well, and intrigued to go even deeper into it I loved the story of Father Louren o Bartolomeu, the real historical figure who invented a flying machine in the early 1700s, and the way it blends into the lives of the other main characters I loved the mysticism blended with the vulgar and the realism of Portugue I love almost everything related to the European Middle Ages and this novel was one of the best I ve ever encountered on the topic It helped me exploreabout Portuguese culture, as well, and intrigued to go even deeper into it I loved the story of Father Louren o Bartolomeu, the real historical figure who invented a flying machine in the early 1700s, and the way it blends into the lives of the other main characters I loved the mysticism blended with the vulgar and the realism of Portuguese social life of the late medieval period I also loved the fact that the cornerstone of the novel is a love story between two very working class characters Their worldview is touching and extremely interesting, insofar as it reveals what the Portuguese peasant thought of the world The brief glimpses of aristocratic life are meaningfully similar, but less humanized Blimunda s touches of the supernatural bring emotion, and the fact that they don t necessarily turn her into a pillar of wisdom is endearing It s also interesting that the book offers insight into a passionate romance between two people in their late 40s and 50s Baltasar and Blimunda is overall out of the ordinary and a beautiful, beautiful book I will probably reread it in 10 years or so