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It is hard to believe that I ve lived this long without reading this classic of Portuguese literature I don t understand How can a so called semi educated person like me go through almost a whole life time not knowing of this book s existence There are some great reviews of this book here in Goodreads that I would urge you to read to find out what the book is about What I want to do here is simply say that this book should be read the way Don Quixote or Madame Bovary or War and Peace or any It is hard to believe that I ve lived this long without reading this classic of Portuguese literature I don t understand How can a so called semi educated person like me go through almost a whole life time not knowing of this book s existence There are some great reviews of this book here in Goodreads that I would urge you to read to find out what the book is about What I want to do here is simply say that this book should be read the way Don Quixote or Madame Bovary or War and Peace or any other book that represents the best writing of a particular time, country, culture You may want to try the English Translation of by Jul Costa the translator of Saramago s books But I m not suggesting you read Os Maias to find out about Portugal in the late 1800 s I m suggesting you read it for the beauty of its language, the rhythm of its sentences, the detailed description that will make you see your own world a little better Most of all read it for what it might do to you, for the way it has of reminding you of your own filled and unfulfilled desires and of recalling the dreams you once had of doing something good and noble and the quiet way Eca de Queiros has of warning you that life can be wasted Os Maias The Maias, E a de Queir sThe Maias is a realist novel by Portuguese author Jos Maria de E a de Queiroz, also known under the modernized spelling E a de Queir s Maia is the name of a fictional family, although some episodes fit into the history of the real Maia family.The book begins with the characters Carlos Eduardo da Maia, Jo o da Ega, Afonso da Maia and Vila a in the family s old house with plans to reconstruct it The house, nicknamed Ramalhete bouquet , is located in Lisbon Os Maias The Maias, E a de Queir sThe Maias is a realist novel by Portuguese author Jos Maria de E a de Queiroz, also known under the modernized spelling E a de Queir s Maia is the name of a fictional family, although some episodes fit into the history of the real Maia family.The book begins with the characters Carlos Eduardo da Maia, Jo o da Ega, Afonso da Maia and Vila a in the family s old house with plans to reconstruct it The house, nicknamed Ramalhete bouquet , is located in Lisbon Its name comes from a tiled panel depicting a bouquet of sunflowers set on the place where the stone with the coat of arms should be As the introductory scene goes on, the story of the Maia family is given, in a flashback style by Afonso 2016 18 04 1399 What a book I can honestly say that I enjoyed it cover to cover I can see why this is a classic in Portuguese literature Sadly I had never heard of the book nor the author until my GR Portuguese friends recommended it Muito obrigado E a de Queir s has been compared to the Portuguese version of Gustave Flaubert On many levels I can see why His book tells tells the story of three generations of Lisbon family, and paints a vivid image of the wealthier side of the city around 1875 Like in Fl What a book I can honestly say that I enjoyed it cover to cover I can see why this is a classic in Portuguese literature Sadly I had never heard of the book nor the author until my GR Portuguese friends recommended it Muito obrigado E a de Queir s has been compared to the Portuguese version of Gustave Flaubert On many levels I can see why His book tells tells the story of three generations of Lisbon family, and paints a vivid image of the wealthier side of the city around 1875 Like in Flaubert, the rich have their muses the poor, not so This is not the historical realism or morality of Emile Zola or Victor Hugo Instead, it is muchsubtle.The plot is a great story Pedro da Maia kills himself after his wife leaves him for an another man and so young Carlos da Maia, his son is raised by his grandfather, Alfonso in his grand house, called O Ramalhete Bouquet on Rua das janelas verdes of Lisboa now one of the sexiest hotels in Europe goes on to become a doctor and practices in the city Like many bourgeoisie of the time, entertainment is a way of life and they enjoy dinners at the swanky Hotel Central on Pra a do Duque da Terceira Life is grande Carlos surrounds himself with a most interesting group of friends, the poet Alencar, the Finish ambassador, Steinbroken, the Englishman, Craft, the Count and Countess of Gouvarinho and of course, his dear friend, Jo o da Ega Ega is quite the character a blend of charismatic goof and bohemian artist in the truest sense And his friendship with Carlos never waivers.At these dinner affairs, talk centers around the arts, literature, politics, good food, wine and the all pervasive charutos At the center of it all women Carlos has an affair with the countess, but then enters Castro Gomes and his wife Maria Eduarda and her daughter Rosa Carlos is smitten Nothing like an affair to liven things up But Maria has a secret past and this affair truly changes the story No spoiler here.E a de Queir s employs a style of gossip, candid talk and a moving storyline that keeps this massive book moving 686 pages Light entertainment and dark passages Witty and humor mixed in with political and social change One of the characters, Guimar es is involved with a party that becomes the communist party Political intrigue financial gains affairs of the heart In effect, a slice of the Portuguese bourgeois life.One thing that perplexed me is the role of women during this time If something happened to her husband, such as death or an affair, often she was left with nothing other than to find another husband especially if she had a young child to support Sadly this is one of the main issues of a historical novel Those were the times Good for some bad for a whole lot of others.There is a lot in this book to discuss and no need to develop a thesis All I can say is if you like a great yarn, a grand historical novel full of outstanding characters, you will like this book I honestly think it needs a wider audience.I waivered between a 4 and 5 rating The fact I enjoyed reading this book so much in a span of ten days shows it deserves a five Now what will I read now This is a classic of 19c Portuguese literature and a tour de force telling the story of the Maia family, and particularly the fate of Carlos Maia It is sort of the classic romantic novel, but with a few twists and some rather colorful characters, one of which, Jo o de Ega, was autobiographical to a degree.The Maia family is excessively rich with property in Lisbon and in the countryside Carlos grandfather, Afonso de Maia, leads the family, but tragedy is not long in coming His melancholic so This is a classic of 19c Portuguese literature and a tour de force telling the story of the Maia family, and particularly the fate of Carlos Maia It is sort of the classic romantic novel, but with a few twists and some rather colorful characters, one of which, Jo o de Ega, was autobiographical to a degree.The Maia family is excessively rich with property in Lisbon and in the countryside Carlos grandfather, Afonso de Maia, leads the family, but tragedy is not long in coming His melancholic son, Pedro de Maia, despondent since the death of his mother, Maria Eduarda Runa, falls in love with a woman, Maria Monforte, whose father is suspected of being a slaver and of low morals Early in their courtship as Pedro and Maria ride back from some shops with the shrunken figure of Maria s father also in the carriage, Afonso, sitting at a caf with his friend Sequeira observes them passing God, she s lovely Afonso did not reply he looked askance at that scarlet parasol that was now leaning towards Pedro, almost concealing him, almost obscuring him, like a large bloodstain spreading over the caleche as it passed beneath the sad green of the trees p 38.There is a lot to unpack in that paragraph in terms of the repeated color red, the reference to blood, and the reference to sad green All of these forshadow the forthcoming tragedy which will result in Maria s flight with an Italian knight along with Maria and Pedro s daughter, leaving behind Carlos de Maia, Pedro and Maria s son Carlos grows up in the shadow of this legacy, spoiled rotten by his doting grandfather, and relatively carefree and unable to focus on any singular activity, flitting around like a hummingbird in socializing as a dandy, dabbing in medicine, and basically spinning his wheels The primary action occurs when Carlos de Maia is a young man and a star of the well healed aristocratic society of Lisbon His best friend, Jo o de Ega, is a playwright and regularly embroiled in scandals, but always faithful to Carlos He and Ega make plans for travel Then Carlos spoke of a plan to go to Italy in the winter with Ega Visiting Italy was, for Ega, a form of intellectual cleansing he needed the placid majesty of marble statues to calm that riotous, overexcited, peninsular imagination of his p 227 Carlos himself was becoming complacent with his life as a dandy He sometimes had dreadful days like this he thought himself a complete dolt , and the pile of torn up, screwed up sheets of paper that accumulated on the carpet at his feet left him feeling like the mere ruin of a man p 257 That being said, he is quite self aware as he tells his grandfather It s a matter of temperament, said Carlos There are inferior beings to whom the sound of an adjective isimportant tthat the exact working of a system and I m one of those monsters p 259 Naturally, the plot will come around to a love intrigue and this is rapidly the case Carlos has a bit of a clothes fetish and a thing for married women, as we see in this description of how and why he is initially seduced by a countess But what drew Carlos eye most was a sofa on which lay, sleeves outspread, like two welcoming arms, the white Genoese velvet jacket she had been wearing when he had seen her for the first time, stepping out of her carriage at the door of her hotel p 265 This is one of thememorable images of Carlos romanticism However, this affair runs its course rather quickly because Carlos rapidly falls for another woman who appears to be married, and who prophetically has the same name as his mother Maria Eduarda He uses his medical training to treat her servant and becomes intimate with her daughter and the domestics of the house The man of the family is away in South America leaving the field clear for Carlos to make a move Things eventually come apart when certain mysteries are revealed causing Carlos grief and thoughts of death then he had foreseen another horror, a supreme punishment, waiting for him in the solitude in which he was burying himself He had already noticed it coming nearer the other night, it had sent a premonitory shudder through him, and tonight, lying beside Maria Eduarda, who had fallen, exhausted, into sleep, he had sensed it tightening its grasp on him, like the first chill of a death agony p 663 After the climax no spoilers , Ega and Carlos plan to take the talked about trip around Europe and Carlos talks of his life philosophy It was a Muslim fatalism Desire nothing and fear nothing Succumb neither to hope nor to disappointment Accept everything, what comes and what escapes one, with the same tranquility with which one accepts the natural changes from stormy days to mild And in that placid state of mind, allow that piece of organized matter called the I gradually to deteriorate and decompose until it re enters and is lost in the infinite universe Above all, have no appetites, and, stillimportant, no discontents p 712 This is actually closer to a Zen Buddhist outlook than Muslim fatalism and a very Enlightenment inspired thought The book abruptly ends as Ega and Carlos, in a manner not unlike the ending of Sentimental Education, chasing a tramway We might still catch it We might still catch it Again the lantern slide away and fled In order to catch the tram, the two friends started racing desperately down Rampa de Santos and along the Aterro beneath the initial glow of the rising moon p 714 Overall, this was a wonderful book Despite it being classified as a romantic novel, it has moments of high humor and its characters have a strong, deep humanity to them Naturally, there is a lack of strong, independent and non tragic female characters, but nonetheless, it shies away from gross, ignorant stereotypes for the most part I enjoyed Carlos and especially Ega as really interesting characters that I would have liked to have a drink with at a bar The storytelling was excellent and this particular translation by Margaret Jill Costa who won awards for this particular translation in fact is vibrant and fluid In The Maias , Eca de Quieros takes on that familiar European theme, the decline of the Great Family, which is, for example, rendered with great seriousness by Thomas Mann in Buddenbrooks and withering scorn by Joseph Roth in The Radetzky March Eca de Quieros preceded both Mann and Roth, but like them he sees in that familial disintegration a microcosm of a diseased society, and his vision is evenjaundiced than Roth s The Maias suffers from several of the unpleasant habits of nine In The Maias , Eca de Quieros takes on that familiar European theme, the decline of the Great Family, which is, for example, rendered with great seriousness by Thomas Mann in Buddenbrooks and withering scorn by Joseph Roth in The Radetzky March Eca de Quieros preceded both Mann and Roth, but like them he sees in that familial disintegration a microcosm of a diseased society, and his vision is evenjaundiced than Roth s The Maias suffers from several of the unpleasant habits of nineteenth century fiction implausible coincidences, long speeches, and sheer weight One wonders whether Eca de Quieros fine scalpel really needed 630 pages in the translation I read to reveal Portugal s society for its egotism and corruption Almost, I am tempted to say The frivolity of the amorous merry go round and the literati who take themselves all too seriously are rendered convincingly, and, if at length, with a pardonable amount of repetition But the vision is too penetrating to remain only satiric the almost Proustian melancholy of the ending, capped by one last surgical strike at what passes for a hero, gives the novel the depth it needs to linger in memory It is worth noting that Eca de Quieros was himself the son of a jurist and an unnamed woman, yet managed a long diplomatic career He fully understands his society, in the way that insiders do, without ever surrendering his perspective as an outsider, or his withering candor Jos Maria de E a de Queiroz 1845 1900 is considered Portugal s greatest novelist, and The Maias 1888 his greatest novel Other books by de Queiroz are The Sins of Father Amaro 1876 and The Illustrious House of Ramires In a long book over 600 pages no detail is forgotten, and a convincing picture of mid 19th century Lisbon is built up The characters all ring true I felt I knew them well The dozens of central characters are all alive, real people with faults, somehow lovable E a de Jos Maria de E a de Queiroz 1845 1900 is considered Portugal s greatest novelist, and The Maias 1888 his greatest novel Other books by de Queiroz are The Sins of Father Amaro 1876 and The Illustrious House of Ramires In a long book over 600 pages no detail is forgotten, and a convincing picture of mid 19th century Lisbon is built up The characters all ring true I felt I knew them well The dozens of central characters are all alive, real people with faults, somehow lovable E a de Queiros writes with great affection even though he deplores the decay of a once great country So many of the book s characters seem real, though presented in brief They come and go and re appear in a complex tapestry of events which makes them astoundingly like people I have known E a de Queiroz has the gift of bringing his world to life and making the reader a part of it The mood is not tragic ironic, satiric, even humorous at times, full of regretlet s just say saudade, even though we English speakers don t really know what that means I was very moved while reading, and for long after Carlos Eduardo de Maia is the sole heir of an ancient, illustrious family The family hopes and ambitions are dependent on him Honour is a very real thing in this culture, and Carlos has a lot of expectations to bear The glorious past and the unsatisfactory present are both with him at all times A central plot strand of the novel details the incestuous love of Carlos and Maria Eduarda, and the tragedy this brings to all concerned The affair is skillfully built up, and comes to a shattering climax.The Maias is a book which mourns many things The decadence of Portuguese culture and spirit the passing of time the loss of things undone Carlos and his friend Ega in the end have fulfilled none of their youthful ambitions.The ending, with the friends Carlos and Ega running after a tram, reminds me of the end of Fellini Satyricon One is suddenly made to realise that these people who have come to life so convincingly, who share my own pains and regrets, livedthan one hundred years ago That poignant shock universalises the reading experience Ambition, the great love of Carlos and Maria Eduarda, the virtues of Alfonso, the literary gifts of Ega, the pretensions and fantasies of so many of the characters, are all futile in the end Fate, and perhaps some innocent fault of their own, conspires against them Life wasn t meant to be fair, and looking back is often a bitter experience.I put the book away with a word of encouragement to Carlos, this imaginary character who died almost a century ago Don t be too cynical, I say your gifts are great, and you have achieved much Visit Maria Eduarda Encourage Ega to finish his book We all grow older, duller What we love inevitably turns to dust I too am thinkingof what might have been than of what might be Biblioteca Ulisseia de Autores PortuguesesOs Maias uma das obras mais conhecidas do escritor portugu s E a de Queiroz O livro foi publicado no Porto emA ac o de Os Maias passa se em Lisboa, na segunda metade do s culo XIX, e apresenta nos a hist ria de tr s gera es da fam lia Maia A ac o inicia se no Outono de , quando Afonso da Maia, nobre e pobre propriet rio, se instala no Ramalhete com o neto rec m formado em Medicina Neste momento faz se uma longa descri o da casa O Ramalhete, cujo nome tem origem num painel de azulejos com um ramo de girass is, e n o em algo fresco ou campestre, tal como o nome nos remete a pensar Afonso da Maia era o personagem mais simp tico do romance e aquele que o autor mais valorizou, pois n o se lhe conhecem defeitos um homem de car cter, culto e requintado nos gostos Em jovem aderiu aos ideais do Liberalismo e foi obrigado, por seu pai, a sair de casa e a instalar se em Inglaterra Ap s o pai falecer regressa a Lisboa para casar com Maria Eduarda Runa, mas pouco tempo depois escolhe o ex lio por raz es de ordem pol tica H em Os Maias um retrato da Lisboa da ep ca Carlos, que mora na Rua das Janelas Verdes, caminha com frequ ncia at ao Rossio embora, por vezes, v a cavalo ou de carruagem Algumas das lojas citadas no livro ainda existem a Casa Havaneza, no Chiado, por exemplo poss vel seguir os diferentes percursos de Carlos ou do Ega pelas suas da Baixa lisboeta, ainda que algumas tenham mudado de nome No final do livro, quando Carlos volta a Lisboa muitos anos depois, somos levados a ver as novidades a Avenida da Liberdade, que substituiu o Passeio P blico, e que descrita como uma coisa nova, e feia pela sua novidade, exactamente como nos anosse falava das casas de emigrante O romance veicula sobre o pa s uma perspectiva muito derrotista, muito pessimista Tirando a natureza o Tejo, Sintra, Santa Ol via , tudo uma choldra ign bil Predomina uma vis o de estrangeirado, de quem s valoriza as civiliza es superiores da Fran a e Inglaterra, principalmente Os pol ticos s o mesquinhos, ignorantes ou corruptos Gouvarinho, Sousa Neto os homens das Letras sao bo mios e dissolutos, retr grados ou distantes da realidade concreta Alencar, Ega lembre se o que se passou no Sarau do Teatro da Trindade os jornalistas bo mios e venais Palma os homens do desporto n o conseguem organizar uma corrida de cavalos, pois n o h hip dromo altura, nem cavalos, nem cavaleiros, as pessoas n o vestem como o evento exigia, as senhoras traziam vestidos de missa Para c mulo de tudo isto, os protagonistas acabam vencidos da vida Apesar de ser isto referido no fim do livro, pode se ver que ainda h alguma esperanca impl cita, nas passagens em que Carlos da Maia e Jo o da Ega dizem que o apetite humano a causa de todos os seus problemas e que portanto nunca mais ter o apetites, mas logo a seguir dizem que lhes est a apetecer um prato de paio com ervilhas, ou quando dizem que a pressa n o leva a nada e que a vida deve ser levada com calma mas come am a correr para apanhar o americano el ctrico Mais do que cr tica de costumes, o romance mostra nos um pa s sobretudo Lisboa que se dissolve, incapaz de se regenerar Quando o autor escreve mais tarde A Cidade e as Serras, exp e uma atitude muito mais construtiva o protagonista regenera se pela descoberta das ra zes rurais ancestrais n o atingidas pela degrada o da civiliza o, num movimento inverso ao que predomina n Os Maias The Maias is recognized as a great masterpiece of late nineteenth century Portugal It describes the political, philosophical, and moral debates prevalent in the aristocracy and bourgeoisie of Portugal in the era in a way very similar to that in which George Eliot examines the same debates in late nineteenth century England in Middlemarch I give George Eliot five stars because I am familiar enough with nineteenth century England that I feel competent to evaluate Ms Eliot s judgement in these a The Maias is recognized as a great masterpiece of late nineteenth century Portugal It describes the political, philosophical, and moral debates prevalent in the aristocracy and bourgeoisie of Portugal in the era in a way very similar to that in which George Eliot examines the same debates in late nineteenth century England in Middlemarch I give George Eliot five stars because I am familiar enough with nineteenth century England that I feel competent to evaluate Ms Eliot s judgement in these areas The Maias may indeed merit five stars also but I simply do not know the historical setting well enough to be sure that Eca de Queiros assessed his world as well as Ms Eliot did for her world What is clear is that Maias is very fine book possibly even a great book.Before reading Maias I had seen it written in several places that de Queiros was a naturalist of the same school as Emile Zola Indeed at one point in this book, the author expresses great admiration for Zola.In truth I found nothing in Maias to remind me of Zola who loves to wallow in the sludge of working class alcoholism, crime and poverty The milieu of Maias is rather that of the educated upper classes The book issimilar in mood and tone to Middlemarch than L Assommoir Most of all however Maias has the delightful light and incisive satirical ambiance of a good Anthony Trollope novel such as Barchester Towers.All in all Maias offers many pleasures and much value The Maias, by E a de Queiroz de Queir s, is a proper doorstop of a C19th novel, over 700 pages long It s late C19th, though, 1888 I was trying to think of apt comparisons, and none of them seemed exactly right, but it s muchGeorge Eliot or Tolstoy than Dickens Or even early C20th novelists like Forster or Proust Though the Proust comparison is not so much to do with style as subject matter the romantic entanglements of wealthy, mildly bohemian society types.Among the themes running th The Maias, by E a de Queiroz de Queir s, is a proper doorstop of a C19th novel, over 700 pages long It s late C19th, though, 1888 I was trying to think of apt comparisons, and none of them seemed exactly right, but it s muchGeorge Eliot or Tolstoy than Dickens Or even early C20th novelists like Forster or Proust Though the Proust comparison is not so much to do with style as subject matter the romantic entanglements of wealthy, mildly bohemian society types.Among the themes running through the book, the one I found most interesting was the question of Portugal s place in the world, which is seen in terms of tradition vs modernity but also Portugal s cultural relationship with other European powers there s a real sense of a smallish country on the edge of Europe looking towards London and Paris with a hint of an inferiority complex So the characters swing between claiming unique virtues for Portugal and admiring, for example, a dress that could only have come from Paris Every discussion, of literature or an event or whatever, turns to comparisons with other countries the yardstick for quality is an external one It s oddly like reading post colonial fiction, even though Portugal was in fact colonist rather than colonised.I think what I liked most about the book was the leisurely pace of it Events at which nothing much happens or at least nothing which is essential to advancing the plot are allowed to spread over five or ten pages There s a 30 page description of them going to the races which is a big set piece within the book, full of social observation, incident and humour, but none of it is actually crucial to the plot On another occasion, in another mood, I might have just been bored by it but this time I enjoyed that expansiveness.In Lisbon, from the Gr mio to the Casa Havanesa, there was already talk of Ega s mistress He, for his part, was trying very hard to keep his happiness safe from prying eyes While perfectly serious about the complicated precautions this entailed, he also took a romantic delight in mystery, and so always chose the most out of the way places, on the outskirts of the city, in the area near the slaughterhouse, for his furtive meetings with the maid who brought him Raquel s letters But his every gesture event he affected way he had of pretending not to look at the clock revealed the enormous pride he felt in that elegant adultery He was perfectly aware that his friends knew all about this glorious adventure of his, and were au fait with the whole drama, and this was perhaps why, when in the company of Carlos or the others, he never even mentioned her name or betrayed the slightest flicker of emotion.One night, however, a night lit by a calm white moon, as he and Carlos were walking along together in silence on their way to Ramalhete, Ega, doubtless filled by a sudden inrush of passion, uttered a heartfelt sigh, reached out his arms and declared to the moon in a tremulous voice Oh, laisse toi donc aimer, oh, l amour c est la vie This escaped his lips like the beginning of a confession Carlos, at his side, said nothing, and simply blew his cigar smoke out into the air.Ega clearly felt somewhat ridiculous, because he immediately recovered himself and pretended a mere literary interest They can say what they want, but there s no one like old Hugo Carlos still said nothing, but he recalled Ega s Naturalist outbursts, in which he had inveighed against Victor Hugo, calling him a spiritualist blabbermouth , an imitative yokel , a lyrical old fool and worse.But that night, Ega, the great phrase maker, went on Ah yes, old Hugo, the heroic champion of the eternal truths We need a bit of idealism, damn it, because the ideal might one day become reality And with this formal recantation he shattered the silence of the streets.A quick name check for Margaret Jull Costa, who translated this edition, and has done a good job of it, as far as I can tell without knowing any Portuguese I ve read the book so many years ago I think I was in 10th grade, but I reckon he was one the best scribblers of Portuguese Of that writ quality I ve found no , until today None like him The idea of incest was difficult to grapple with, at that time The Proust of Portugalby James Guidain view spoiler Just a sample of this 19th century portuguese Esta existencia nem sempre assim correra com a tranquillidade larga e clara d um bello rio de v I ve read the book so many years ago I think I was in 10th grade, but I reckon he was one the best scribblers of Portuguese Of that writ quality I ve found no , until today None like him The idea of incest was difficult to grapple with, at that time The Proust of Portugalby James Guidain view spoiler Just a sample of this 19th century portuguese Esta existencia nem sempre assim correra com a tranquillidade larga e clara d um bello rio de ver o O antepassado, cujos olhos se enchiam agora d uma luz de ternura diante das suas rosas, e que ao canto do lume relia com gosto o seu Guisot, f ra, na opini o de seu pae, algum tempo, o mais feroz Jacobino de Portugal E todavia, o furor revolucionario do pobre mo o consistira em l r Rousseau, Volney, Helvetius, e a Encyclopedia em atirar foguetes de lagrimas Constitui o e ir, de chapeu liberal e alta gravata azul, recitando pelas lojas ma onicas Odes abominaveis ao Supremo Architecto do Universo Isto, por m, bast ra para indignar o pae Caetano da Maia era um portuguez antigo e fiel que se benzia ao nome de Robespierre, e que, na sua apathia de fidalgo beato e doente, tinha s um sentimento vivo o horror, o odio ao Jacobino, aquem attribuia todos os males, os da patria e os seus, desde a perda das colonias at s crises da sua gota Para extirpar da na o o Jacobino, d ra elle o seu amor ao sr infante D Miguel, Messias forte e Restaurador providencial E ter justamente por filho um Jacobino, parecia lhe uma prova o comparavel s s de Job hide spoiler