[[ Leer ]] ➳ Halo: Primordium: Book Two of the Forerunner Saga (Halo: Forerunner Saga) Autor Greg Bear – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

The Second Novel Of The Forerunner Saga Trilogy By Science Fiction Legend Greg Bearset In The Halo Universe And Based On The New York Times Bestselling Video Game Series One Hundred Thousand Years Ago In The Wake Of The Apparent Self Destruction Of The Alien Forerunner Empire, Two HumansChakas And Riserare Like Flotsam Washed Up On Very Strange Shores Indeed Captured By The Forerunner Known As The Master Builder And Then Misplaced During A Furious Battle In Space, Chakas And Riser Now Find Themselves On An Inverted World, Where Horizons Rise Into The Sky And Humans Of All Kinds Are Trapped In A Perilous Cycle Of Horror And Neglect They Have Become Both Research Animals And Strategic Pawns In A Cosmic Game Whose Madness Knows No Enda Game Of Ancient Vengeance Between The Powers Who Seeded The Galaxy With Life, And The Forerunners Who Expect To Inherit Their Sacred Mantle Of Responsibility To All Living Things In The Company Of A Young Girl And An Old Man, Chakas Begins An Epic Journey Across A Lost And Damaged Halo Ringworld In Search Of A Way Home, An Explanation For The Warrior Spirits Rising Up Within, And The Reason For The Forerunner Librarians Tampering With Human Destiny Their Travels Will Take Them Into The Domain Of A Powerful And Monstrous Intelligenceknown As The Captive By Forerunners, And The Primordial By Ancient Human Warriors, This Being May Not Only Control The Fate Of Chakas, Riser, And The Rest Of Humanity, But Of All Sentient Life Across The Galaxy


4 thoughts on “Halo: Primordium: Book Two of the Forerunner Saga (Halo: Forerunner Saga)

  1. Ben Brown Ben Brown says:

    Typically, when one is reading a series of sci fi or fantasy novels, there comes a point usually after the end of the first book, MAYBE a bit into the second book when the reader will feel totally at home within the trilogy that is to say, they ll have developed a solid grasp of the world and characters, and can progress into the ongoing story without feeling like they re still having to learn the complicated ins and outs of the basic mythos It s the point where the reader can or less sit back, relax, and enjoy the story being told to them, without fear of being left behind In essence, it s a reward to the reader, from the author You ve put in the hard work of getting the world I ve created Now it s time for you to enjoy the story I have to tell If The Forerunner Saga is any indication, Greg Bear clearly doesn t care about rewarding his readers.That s not necessarily a criticism, mind you, but of a warning anyone going into these novels expecting easy to understand world building or clear motivations on the parts of the characters are in for a disappointment Because two books and 731 pages into Bear s trilogy, and I STILL find myself struggling quite massively to understand even the most basic underlying ideas of Bear s mythology What do the Forerunners do Where did the Flood come from What s humanity s purpose in the galaxy What was the end goal for the Halo rings These are core foundational questions about the narrative that are still being kept I m assuming purposefully unclear, at least until again, I m assuming the third and final novel in the trilogy, Silentium, at which point last time, I promise assumedly the shroud will be lifted and the exact nature of what exactly is going on will be revealed If not well, I m gonna be than a little ticked off for devoting as much time and mental energy as I have into these things.To say that The Forerunner Saga so far has proven to be an exhausting and somewhat unsatisfying experience would be an understatement it s not exactly fun to read two uber dense sci fi novels and still be left at the end with almost zero clue of what s going on And yet YET I m still holding out hope that with Silentium, Bear can crystallize exactly what s what, bring everything full circle no pun intended , and prove that this long, long ride through this corner of the Halo universe will have had a point beyond just confounding the reader Right now, I m skeptical but I would also love nothing than to be proven wrong.


  2. Luis Fernandez Luis Fernandez says:

    I just finished this book and I m than a little disappointed The book tells the tale of Chakas, one for the two humans from the first Forerunner saga book He lands on a Halo and spends the rest of the book walking around following a lady, who is nuts, and an old man I d say a majority of the book is them walking and looking for food and describing how hard that is That and explaining that they don t really know what they re doing or where they are going At the end, it gets interesting and explains of the flood stuff I get that these are supposed to be connected to the story arc of Halo 4 but there is some incongruity about the Bornstellar Didacts motives that don t gel as far as I could tell Also the whole tying in of what the Monitors really are was kind of a real groaner moment for me This combined with the heavy handedness of the anti Katherine Halsey thread of the game current time books is mildly disappointing I wouldn t recommend this book to anyone unless you re a super die hard Halo geek Even then get ready for a series of descriptions or plot twists, that even with multiple re readings for clarity, make little sense or occasionally come out of nowhere.


  3. Relytia Relytia says:

    Wow, what a surprise this book has been I came in expecting it to be the darker middle entry in a trilogy that would ultimately have a tragic but hopeful ending This book is not that It is dark to be sure, but in many ways, this hardly feels in any way like a sequel toCryptum The only thing that even reminds me that this is related to that book is that some characters reappear, and that it takes place on a Halo, but that s about it That s not necessarily a bad thing, but there s no doubt this book suffers a bit than the first, despite its strengths.This book takes place starting at an event roughly two thirds of the way through Cryptum, when everyone has been captured by the Master Builder Somehow, Chakas and Riser have been misplaced in a chaotic situation and end up on a rogue Halo installation, now under the control of the mysterious Primordial and the rampant AI Mendicant Bias The story is told through Chakas viewpoint, and chronicles his journey alongside companions new and old across the surface of this great ringworld, in excruciating detail It s a VERY interesting story and quite compelling at times There are tons of genuinely fascinating concepts, ideas, events, and characters dotting the landscape of this story The actual events and revelations are truly great and some are even moving It s not perfect though Characters moods and emotions will sometimes change on a dime for seemingly no reason, and it feels at times like there s little genuine character development, which is a shame after Cryptum did such a good job at that.Much like Cryptum, Bear really captures the essence of the main character, and his viewpoint of the world becomes our own in the story Because of that though, I find that the story in Primordium has almost no structure The perspective is firmly focused on Chakas, what happens to him, and what he thinks about everything happening, but the narrative of the book never has any structure that really tells you what is happening in the overall Forerunner Trilogy big picture You have to figure it out yourself in many parts The characters have no destination in mind, are confused for most of the book as to what to do or where to go, and trust me, you ll share those feelings of confusion and uncertainty I m not sure if that was a purposeful narrative decision by Greg Bear, and I m also not certain of whether or not it s a good thing When you add in the ancestral imprints by the Librarian, who are practically characters unto themselves, and you ve got another layer of complication Another side effect of seeing the world through Chakas eyes is that, because pretty much everything outside of Earth is foreign and mysterious to Chakas, descriptions of almost everything are really confusing and nonsensical Bornstellar at least understood what Forerunner tech was and how it worked and so did we as readers, even if we didn t understand all of its inner workings, we at could at least understand what function it had and what it did Chakas has no clue as to even that, so encounters with, for example, Forerunner cities or transport trains on Halo, are confusing to even figure out how to imagine what it looks like in our minds.I find that this book suffers from the issues that Cryptum had, but much, much so Many of the important revelations in the story are buried and almost lost in tons and tons of exposition that focuses on minute and completely unimportant details It s no exaggeration to say that for every page of genuinely compelling development in the overall narrative, there s anywhere from 7 10 pages of, for narrative purposes, useless information that merely extends the story s mass Tons of effort went into describing minute details of every landscape they came across, the smallest details of landmarks such as a tree or a structure, and things like that Then, huge moments, such as encounters with the Primordial or Mendicant Bias, flash by in just a few pages Thankfully, all of the exposition is still focused on fascinating things, such as the Halo s landscape and innerworkings, as well as the countless people all inhabiting the Halo Even if it is fluff, it s still pretty interesting to take in Personally, I don t mind pensive, meandering novels I lovedXenocide, which was much the same way and so I liked most of Primordium myself despite all the fluff I can t deny that this book definitely has a ton of build ups without enough pay off to justify it though, and sometimes the overall narrative gets buried by all the fluff Really, all of the pivotal information could be condensed into a short story ranging anywhere from 100 180 pages and still be good Who knows This book is genuinely compelling, its overall story is quite interesting if not confusing to patch together at times, and has a lot of interesting revelations at a pivotal, but small event in the Forerunner Flood war.Personally, I found it hard to put the book down a lot of the time, but after finishing it, I recognize its flaws and some can be glaring There s a lot of mind blowing revelations in this book, and some of the pay offs, while not given nearly as much page space as the build ups, are truly spectacular I just find that this book is not as good as Cryptum I understand that Bear was given strict instructions by 343 Industries about what details to include to give us tantalizing hints at what s to come in Halo 4, but also plenty of details to exclude, so as to keep Halo 4 surprising and compelling when we finally play it I understand that, but sometimes in the name of keeping on this strict narrative schedule, this book suffered a bit.Silentiumseems poised to answer all questions that the first two books left unanswered released a couple months after Halo 4 of course Gotta keep that schedule P It was hard for me to rate this book, but despite its problems, I enjoyed it If you are a massive Halo fan like I am, then this is a good book to get, but it will also take some effort to get into and understand, not to mention patience to keep up with it I hope that helps Thank you and good day.


  4. Scotty Bowers Scotty Bowers says:

    If you are a lover of Halo then this series is a good read for you it gives background and sheds light on to why there are no forerunners left and how it came to be that way you learn a great deal about their casts, way of life, politics, and there downfall even though you know the outcome before you start reading it is still wonderful to find out what happened and why you start to see what type of person the Didactic was and why he is the way he is.